‘Over the past 20 years, Spain has become the most dynamic wine region in Europe,’ says Wine Spectator, referring to the emergence of modern icons like Numanthia that offer a combination of…

Over the past 20 years, Spain has become the most dynamic wine region in Europe,’ says Wine Spectator, referring to the emergence of modern icons like Numanthia that offer a combination of power and elegance never seen before. While vineyards in the Toro region have been tended since Roman times, Numanthia came to being in 1998, capturing the essence of vineyards up to 150 years old.

Numanthia and its baby brother Termes are opposite in style to traditional Rioja such as López de Heredia, for example. New oak, bold fruit and serious tannins are seamlessly knit with fresh acidity and fine purity; no doubt the result of brutally cold winters and hot summers.

Along with Termes, produced from ‘younger’ 50-year-old vines, Numanthia is produced from ‘Tinta de Toro’ – a clone of Tempranillo that has adapted to the immensely dry conditions. The sparsely planted old vines produce tiny berries that yield less than 2 tonnes per hectare; offering concentration on another level.

For those who love plush, modern wines, these 2 are absolute must-haves.

Tasting notes:

Numanthia, Numanthia 2014
An instantly polished impression on the nose with lively dark plum and black cherry fruits swathed in spicy complexity. The texture is seamless, saturated in energetic dark plum fruit flavor. A great wine. Try from 2020. – James Suckling, 96/100

This red is rich, yet remains lively, with bright berry and tangerine flavors mingling with currant, cocoa and toasty notes. Well-integrated tannins and citrusy acidity support the plush texture. Vibrant, in the modern style. Drink now through 2028. – Wine Spectator, 93/100

Numanthia, Termes 2015
Cropped from a warm and ripe year, the entry-level 2015 Termes was able to keep its poise and balance. It has balsamic aromas and flavors, with sweet fruit on the palate. It’s 15% alcohol and matured in French barriques for 14 months. – Wine Advocate, 90/100

 

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